Justin White, Landscaping Lessons | Keep landscaping colorful year-round – Santa Cruz Sentinel

In most of California’s regions, the winter and fall seasons can seem bleak and boring. Leaves disappear from trees, most plants stop blooming, and the sky turns gray. But what if you could enjoy color in your garden all year round? While most perennial flowers usually have a flowering period, there are a few strains that still show up during the darker months. Expand the colorful joys of spring and summer by planting these off-season blooms in your landscape.

Sun hat

Sun hat is available in orange, red, purple, pink, green and white and is available in different colors and sizes. It is easy to grow and is known to be drought tolerant. Make sure the flowers have enough sunlight and not too much shade for the blooms to bloom over several seasons. Deadhead some of the flowers in early summer to ensure plenty of new growth in the fall. Coneflower is also a great nectar plant for attracting butterflies.

Sedum

This plant glows the brightest in autumn, when the color of its flowers increases at lower temperatures. In late fall, the sedum foliage can be green, purple, or variegated, and even some varieties turn red, orange, or yellow. Sedum is adaptable and stable and a nice addition to any garden or outdoor area.

Perennial geraniums

There are several types of geraniums, but some types can shine in autumn and even winter. It also comes in a number of pigments including white, peach, red, orange, purple, and even two-tone. Geraniums are easy to care for and are good for containers, ground cover or garden borders. Resistant to disease and pests, you will admire its charm for most of the year.

Twinspur / Diascia

Snapdragon’s cousin, Twinspur (also known as Diascia), does well in the colder seasons. It loves the sun and is best for areas with moist soil but good drainage. This ornamental plant can bloom with flowers of white, purple, pink, and orange, all with a yellow contrasting center. Diascia flowers designed with two oil spores are specially pollinated by Rediviva bees.

April showers don’t just have to bring May flowers. Plant some of these “late bloomers” in your landscape to keep the natural beauty in abundance all year round!

Justin White is the CEO of K&D Landscaping, headquartered in Watsonville, California, and was named Business of the Year 2020 by the Pajaro Valley Chamber of Commerce. White is also the current president of the local chapter of the California Landscape Contractors Association (CLCA) on the central coast. He is involved in several non-profit organizations across the community. For more information on landscaping, outdoor and gardening requirements, contact K&D Landscaping at kndlandscaping.com.

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